The non-emotional Carlson

Crooks further unravels his emotion on page 71 and 72 in a way that he reverses the ethnic discrimination towards Lennie instead of himself.Steinbeck writes, ‘‘Crooks’ face lightened with pleasure in his torture’’ to convey that Crooks wants to know what it feels like to tease someone who is socially and ethnically privileged during the 1930’s and he seems to take a liking to teasing the unaware Lennie who’s power and strength is suddenly underestimated by Crooks as he was not part of the previous events with Curley and Lennie in the last chapter because he would not have been allowed to enter the ranch house without being shooed off by the non-emotional Carlson or any other ranch men who show no respect to Crooks.This adds further loneliness to Crooks as he doesn’t get to be part of anything that takes place around the ranch. The effects of being alone and discriminated for all this time reflects a new negative emotion from Crooks at the bottom of Page 73 where he denies any possible dream that Lennie see to be true by saying, ‘‘…

an’ every damn one of ’em’s got a little piece of land in his head. An’ never a God damn on on ’em ever gets it.Just like heaven…Nobody gets to heaven’’. This sudden out lash of Crook’s negative opinions tells the reader that he has turned cold and sour over the years of being alone and having no one to talk to. He talks negatively on a religious scale as well saying that no one ever gets to heaven, this channels the message that Crooks feels nothing for religion and it’s only a lost dream just like the American Dream Lennie and George are thinking of.When Candy appears on Page 74 Steinbeck changes Crooks current emotion to pleasure because the dramatic increase in positive communication towards other people (especially of the opposite skin-colour) in Crook’s minimal lifestyle. He writes, ‘‘It was difficult for Crooks to conceal his pleasure with anger’’ and yet more loneliness is shown here by Crooks because he is cordoned off by his own ‘rights’ to have no other person compromise his living quarters but he is more reassured now so surely that raises Crooks emotion to happiness because of his (so called) ‘instant popularity’.But as we know this ‘popularity’ eventually fades away but Crooks is too overjoyed to be aware of it.

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When Candy blurts out the plan to leave the ranch and move into their own place just him, Lennie and George, Crooks can’t help but feel that his own shattered dream ,which he dismissed to be impossible, could become true and that he could finally live an easy life like he did when he was a child; not being discriminated, not being lonely, have companionship.This appeals to Crooks in special way where he actually builds up the courage to ask Candy and Lennie if he could work aside them on the farm doing odd-jobs. And the way Steinbeck writes to make Crooks seem eager yet hesitant from the way he speaks, ‘‘…If you…guys would want a hand to work for nothing-just his keep, why I’d come an’ lend a hand…’’ to show that he has literally taken in all his pride to ask for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that Crooks cannot refuse if it means making his dream come true.