The two different acts in Hobsons Choic

The next scene in which, Willie is important is when he is called up from the cellar by Maggie. As he gets up, Maggie asks to see his hands. He turns them over, “Hesitantly”, and replies, “They’re dirty. ” This phrase shows us that Willie is very timid and feels rather inferior. The reader can see this because he feels his hands are grubby and reflect his lowly class position as a boot hand.

By the phrase, “They’re dirty”, the reader can tell that Willie is very simple because he thinks that Maggie is examining his hands when really, she is complementing him about them.Maggie says, “I know they’re dirty, but they’re clever. ” This shows the reader that although Willie is a simple man, with a very poor education, he has an ability to make superb leather boots. Also in this act, Maggie asks Will to wed her and for them to go into their own partnership together. Will is taken aback by this offer from Maggie because he is bemused why a member of a class higher than his own would ask him to wed her and go into a business partnership together.The reason for Willie’s reaction is that in the 19th Century it was very unusual for members of different classes to mix and congregate. It was very unusual for two members of different classes to get married and go into a business together.

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There was a need in performance of these early scenes, to show the audience how timid and unsure of himself Willie Mossop is. I chose to present only half my person out of the trap when called upon to meet Mrs Hepworth, by Hobson.This way, my lowly position in society as a working class member, was mirrored by my position looking up to the characters. I made an effort to make my body language look inhibited so I avoided, lengthy eye contact, occasionally dropped my head, and retreated into my body by rounding my shoulders. In act four, the final act of the play, the reader is able to see the way in which William Mossop has changed from a timorous, unambitous boot hand, to a clever business man.

Throughout the play, Willie and Maggie have become very attracted and have come together and moved away from Hobson’s boot shop and created their own business in Oldfield Road. Hobson’s business begins to decline quite rapidly after the leaving of Willie and Maggie. He decides to ask them both back at his own expense.

As he talks to Maggie and Willie, Maggie says, “You’d better speak out Will. ” This shows that Will, now has the confidence to speak to people higher than himself and that he has changed from the timorous boot hand that he used to be.At this point, Will starts to speak to Hobson. He tells him how well his and Maggie’s business is going and that he has paid off all his debts. He uses the phrase, “and a bit o’ brass on top o’ that.

” This tells the reader that his business is making money. He explains that although the shop is in a cellar, the people come and see him rather than Hobson. He goes on to explain how Hobson’s trade has gone down and how he, Hobson, is on his knees, begging for Maggie and Will to come back to Hobson’s boot shop.