The final works of The Circus series

At the arrival of 90’s, in 1981, Evergon began using the Polaroid SX-70 camera, adopting a structure that he based on the previous Xerox format; comparing to the Xerox color prints, Interlocking Polaroids are similar in construction, but differ in overall pictorial effect, being primarily romantic, decorative figure-studies, a delightful combination of primary colors saturated by the lusciousness of the Polaroid print quality. (James and the Paper Tongue(1982), Denis in Bondage with Silk Scarves(1981-1982)By the mid-1990s, the economy was brighter and so were the colors; by 1990, when Evergon ceased to use the big Polaroid cameras, he had created a significant coherent body of powerful, resonant works in these impressive formats, using Caravaggio light key for the most of his creations, culminating in the series called The Circus (1988) and in initial Ramboys images, the prologue to the major black and white work which is still in progress. The first Ramboys images were actually made in color in 1990, before the final works of The Circus series.They share the props and settings with these images and have significant stylistic affinities with Evergon’s other Polaroid work as well.

Deeply conscious of the meaning of his work, Evergon has reassessed the use of color and light in his photographs at various stages of his carrier. In the large-format Polaroids he used a ‘Caravaggio’ lighting among with very narrow palette of colors. “The whole set is bathed in the strong yellow light that Caravaggio used so frequently in his later paintings, what the artist Francesco Albani (..

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.) called the light of “ground flesh”. Where does that light come from? (..

) the light that gives the scene its unity and touches each and everyone of the participants – the needy and the giving, the mortals and the immortal – comes from elsewhere. (… ) It comes from wherever we are standing, left, right or center as if the scene existed solely thought the light that we might bring to it. In Caravaggio’s paintings the light is the viewer’s own; without it the seven acts of mercy will fade back into blacks of shadows and the night.

“(5) According Deborah T. Sharpe (6), ‘Numerous research projects have generally shown that red, yellow, and orange are associated with excitement, stimulation and aggression; blue and green are associated with calm, security and peace; black, brown and gray are associated with melancholy, sadness and depression; yellow is associated with cheer, gaiety, and fun; and purple is associated with dignity royalty and sadness’, although color is more than a combination of red, green, and blue or cyan, magenta, yellow, and black.It is non-verbal communication and this is such a broad topic, that only its counters can be suggested here. Clearly, colors have a significance all their own and an ability the influence the psyche directly. By evoking non-linear color symbolism associations in memory, rather that direct narrative, these series of images, with their complex symbolic structure are in conversation with the viewer because of the simplicity of color semiotics, consciously implied by Evergon to document the rites and ceremonies of a fictional, hedonistic boy culture where playfulness and fantasy are fundamental.As the end of the decade when the new century came into view, the inevitable implication of digital technology brought to the shore of postmodern photography a notion of post-photography within digital imaging along with new hues of colors. In other words, the physical difference between photographic and digital technology is leading to the difference in the logic of film-based and digital images and also to the differences in their cultural perception because digital photographs function in an entirely different way from traditional photographs.

“the essential characteristic of digital information is that can be manipulated easily and very rapidly by computer. It is simply a matter of substituting new digits for old… Computational tools for transforming, combining, altering, and analyzing images are as essential to the digital artist as brushes and pigments to a painter. “(8) But there is another aspect of the problem, we may call it a “computer enhanced” or “computer assisted” adjunct to traditional photography.What is the difference conceptually, ethically, or practically if the images are enhanced digitally on a computer, or by traditional methods in a darkroom? Both digital and darkroom practice are respective crafts with the same intention, to translate a recording human experience into an visual aesthetic experience. A major challenge to the visual artist has always been one of how to transform ideas into a work of art in a way that best conveys the intended message.

In many cases, the success of this process is directly controlled by the medium chosen, whether it is paint, platinum/palladium, calotype, C-41, or bits and bytes. As these production processes vary, so does a medium’s ability to express the thoughts and ideas of the artist. Artworks created in different mediums come into being in different ways, affecting the train of thought and the flow of ideas.