The Change in Society in, "In Cold Blood"

Khaqhovia Lee Ms. Bolle IB English November 18, 2012 The Clutter’s death fades as time disperses the clouds of darkness, revealing winds of prosperity. Within the frigid pages of In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, death haunts the living as time sways through the air. A reunion between Dewey and Susan Kidwell, portrays the endless chain of life and death, as the waves of turmoil of the Clutter family’s death to the execution the murderers. Fields of wheat wave to the dead and the blue sky protecting a bright future ahead.Truman Capote displays the cycle of life and death and the cleansing of the curse left behind, after the murder of the Clutters. Vivid life surrounded by a frozen cemetery creates a contradiction of life and death.

Capote introduces death as the “wreaths, brown roses, and rain faded ribbons still lay upon the raw earth. ” Capote incorporates lifeless objects, and the ribbons which have been fading away with the rain, as the turmoil of the Clutter’s death on the town diminishes as time continues. Using dark and fading colors displays the disappearance of the Clutter’s death in the townspeople’s lives.Time continues to remove the effects of the Clutters’ death, and “close by, fresher petals spilled across a new mound. ” The fresh petals pertain to a new era which the living continues as time disperses the clouds of chaos. Capote incorporates a transition of location, close by, which also signifies the changes which will occur benefitting the town. Truman Capote conveys the effects of time through characters, “a willowy girl with white-gloved hands, a smooth cap of dark-honey hair, and long, elegant leg. The description of Susan Kidwell, Nancy Clutter’s friend, who stands at the Clutters’ grave, provides the ever haunting spirits of the murder.

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Capote’s precise description of the girl conjures an image within the mind. Willow trees mean graceful and a symbol of joy, which conveys Susan’s beauty. People gather around during the times of the Clutters’ immediate death, but the people begin to realize life will continue with or without the Clutters.

Susan develops into a beautiful girl for whom Dewey does not recognize and yet she is a witness to the murders.The clouds of the past clear as the scars of the hearts of close friends and witnesses will be carried on through life. Physical changes of the town and the characters display people moving on in their lives and not dwelling on the murder. The changing lives of the witness are continuously haunted by the memories of future plans and shattering through the night of the Clutters’ deaths. Capote reveals the change of the era of turmoil during the Clutters’ death and the rebirth of civilization by Susan Kidwell attending her “junior year at K.U… Nancy and I planned to go to college together. We were going to be roommates. ” Susan reminisces of her past with Nancy, all their plans of college torn apart, displaying continuous memories of horror which she witnessed.

Susan also becomes the embodiment of Nancy. Capote foretells Susan’s future through her characteristics, bright and cheerful. The unchanging setting of the town remains entangled of the crime, and “there’s some talk about paving the street. But you know Holcomb… don’t spent much time there.

Capote incorporates allusion into the novel but paving a new bright path on top of a bloody road which changed the town. Holcomb attempts to cover their past by repainting the road. The new road also foreshadows the new future presented to the townspeople, but “Dewey looked at the gray stone inscribed with four names, and the date of their death: November 15, 1959. ” The detective of the murders still remains stunned at the grave site, unable to understand the complexity of the crime which leads him to contradict his own beliefs through the deaths of others.Capote’s diction within the writing contains many meanings; the word inscribed, which are permanently set in stone, also literally set in stone. Contradicting life and death, where death continues to walk aside life instead of ending in the dark past.

Capote illustrates the contradiction between the past and the future through nature. The beautiful skies and the fields of hope for the relations which hold the witnesses and Clutters’ together, blossom into a new future. Truman Capote foreshadows the future of the town and the witnesses through nature.Hope rises in “the big sky, the whisper of wind voices in the wind-bent wheat. ” The curse of the Clutters’ death is cleansed under the vast pure sky and the voice of the wind seals the evil which wanders in their hearts.

The imagery of voices of the wind also alludes to the peace in the air. Capote incorporates alliteration and consonance, the multiple “w” and “s” sounds convey gentleness and peacefulness. Calm breezes, and a sunlit sky where “Sue… disappeared down the path, a pretty girl in a hurry, her smooth hair winging, shining-just such a young woman as Nancy might have been. ” Susan follows the path of the deceased Nancy and no negative aura is seen as she rushes off. Susan’s smooth shining hair swinging foreshadows a bright future. Susan also inherits a trait from Nancy as well, the gift of time, “he told her it was past four… I’ve got to run… nice to have seen you, Mr. Dewey.

” Susan continues to follow the footsteps of her friend. Susan is no longer haunted by Nancy but receives Nancy’s blessings as Susan continues to live through life.Capote paints a scene of peace and prosperity as time passes and foretells the fortunes of the witness as they continue through their lives.

Capote creates internal conflict between the living and the murders of the Clutters. The deaths convey distrust between each other, but time resolves distrust and creates a new civil life for the town. A new future opens up to the people and a fresh start begins; the deaths resemble no more than an unfortunate event in the towns past as everyone moves on in their lives.