Water, Religion and Eco-Justice

Environmental health has been either unknown or neglected by many people depending on how much aware people have been.Today’s world is more aware of the environmental damages human activities have been causing for centuries. The negative effects of human activities on environment are multiple; they include global warming, pollution, waste, resource depletion, water depletion, etc. In this paper, I would like to review the importance of liturgical and interfaith connections of water and eco-justice from our Earth Day service project on April 24 2013 at my University.

I will emphasize the African perspective. 1. Ecological BackgroundAfrican worldview is disputed among scholars especially in terms of its ecological friendliness. Some scholars think African world view is anthropocentric and its partnership with nature is just a matter of ethics and morality. For Taringa for example, the Shona people’s1 relationships with the cleared land or animals or spirits of the dead or the bush or other living creatures are “primarily relationships with spirits and not necessarily ecological relationships with nature” (Taringa, 196). The relationships are as a moral response to God the creator and to the ancestors of the land: “it is a moral agency” (Taringa, 196), she points out.

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Taringa’s point is important to prevent over-romanticizing African ecological world view. However, I disagree with the fact that ethical or moral agency be separated from ecology. Salie Mcfague argues that the “environmental crisis is a theological problemthat encourages or permits our destructive, unjust actions” (Salie McFague, 31). The use of destructive and unjust recalls a moral agency in dealing with ecological issues.I agree with Kizito when he points out that “for Christian traditions, the ecological crisis is also a theologico-ethical crisis” (Kizito, 339). We cannot separate ecological issues from ethical responsibly. On the opposi.

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